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Pete Brodsky

Principal Engineer

Email

brodsky@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-543-4216

Research Interests

Autonomous and Manned Vehicle Command and Control, Underwater Navigation, Digital Signal and Image Processing

Biosketch

Peter Brodsky develops command and control software for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). In support of this discipline, he also writes tools for AUV flight prediction, simulation, and underwater navigation. At least five different AUVs are now in his repertoire, of both the propeller and buoyancy-driven varieties. In addition, Mr. Brodsky supports projects in the areas of acoustic simulation, ocean property estimation, and image-processing and automatic target recognition. Two and three dimensional graphical displays of geometric data are another field of expertise. A former Merchant Marine officer, Mr. Brodsky has extensive seagoing experience. He has over 20 years developing scientific and realtime control software on a variety of desktop and embedded systems. Mr. Brodsky joined the Laboratory's Environmental and Information Systems Department in 1999.

Education

B.S. Oceanography & Meteorology, SUNY Maritime College, 1982

M.S. Applied Mathematics, Johns Hopkins University, 1989

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Acoustic sensor systems on a flying wing underwater glider and two prop-driven autonomous underwater vehicles

D'Spain, G., R. Zimmerman, S.A. Jenkins, D.B. Rimington, J.C. Luby, and P. Brodsky, "Acoustic sensor systems on a flying wing underwater glider and two prop-driven autonomous underwater vehicles," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 123, 3007, doi:10.1121/1.2932590, 2008.

More Info

1 May 2008

The Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography operates several underwater vehicles including an autonomous underwater glider based on a flying wing design and two prop-driven autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) manufactured by Bluefin Robotics. The objective of this presentation is to describe the acoustic sensor systems on these platforms and provide sample results from the at-sea data. The glider, with a 6.1-m wing span, was developed jointly by the Marine Physical Lab and the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington. It is designed to maximize the horizontal distance traveled between changes in buoyancy (i.e., maximize its "finesse") while quietly listening to sounds in the ocean. A 27-element hydrophone array with 5 kHz per channel bandwidth is located in the sonar dome all along the wing's leading edge. In addition, it has a four-component acoustic vector sensor in its nose. The two prop-driven AUVs have been equipped with hull-mounted hydrophone arrays with 10 kHz bandwidth for passive synthetic aperture studies, an acoustic vector sensor, and active acoustic imaging systems for ocean bottom-subbottom mapping. Results from the data processing illustrate the tight coupling between acoustic sensor systems, signal array processing methods, and vehicle behavior.

Underwater acoustic measurements with a flying wing glider

D'Spain, G.L., R. Zimmerman, S.A. Jenkins, J.C. Luby, and P. Brodsky, "Underwater acoustic measurements with a flying wing glider," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 121, 3107, 2007.

More Info

1 May 2007

Liberdade, a new class of underwater glider based on a flying wing design, has been under development for the past 3 years in a joint project between the Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington. This hydrodynamically efficient design maximizes the horizontal distance traveled between changes in buoyancy, thereby minimizing average power consumed in horizontal transport to achieve "persistence." The first fully autonomous glider of this class, "XRay," was deployed and operated successfully in the Monterey Bay 2006 experiment. Communications, including real-time glider status reports, were accomplished using an underwater acoustic modem as well as with an Iridium satellite system while on the surface. The payload included hydrophone array, with 10 kHz per channel bandwidth, located in a sonar dome along the leading edge of the 6.1-m-span wing. Narrowband tones from 3.0 to 8.5 kHz were transmitted from a ship-deployed controlled underwater source. During the glider's flight, lift-to-drag ratios (equal to the inverse of the glide slope) exceeded 10/1. However, specific flight behaviors that deviated from this efficient horizontal transport mode allowed for improved detection and localization by the hydrophone array.

Innovative 3D Visualization of Electro-optic Data for Mine Countermeasures

Brodsky, P.M., J.C. Luby, and J.I. Olsonbaker, "Innovative 3D Visualization of Electro-optic Data for Mine Countermeasures," APL-UW TR 0401, March 2004.

30 Mar 2004

Inventions

Autonomous Glider Control

Record of Invention Number: 47682

Pete Brodsky

Disclosure

19 Apr 2016

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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