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Beth Curry

Research Associate

Email

bethc@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-685-8326

Education

Ph.D. Physical Oceanography, University of Washington, 2013

M.S. Physical Oceanography, University of Washington, 2009

B.S. Civil Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2002

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Studies of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago water transport and its relationship to basin-local forcing: Results from AO-FVCOM

Zhang, Y., C. Chen, R.C. Beardsley, G. Gao, Z. Lai, B. Curry, C.M. Lee, H. Lin, J. Qi, and Q. Xu, "Studies of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago water transport and its relationship to basin-local forcing: Results from AO-FVCOM," J. Geophys. Res., 121, 4392-4415, doi:10.1002/2016JC011634, 2016.

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1 Jun 2016

A high-resolution (up to 2 km), unstructured-grid, fully coupled Arctic sea ice-ocean Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (AO-FVCOM) was employed to simulate the flow and transport through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) over the period 1978–2013. The model-simulated CAA outflow flux was in reasonable agreement with the flux estimated based on measurements across Davis Strait, Nares Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Jones Sounds. The model was capable of reproducing the observed interannual variability in Davis Strait and Lancaster Sound. The simulated CAA outflow transport was highly correlated with the along-strait and cross-strait sea surface height (SSH) difference. Compared with the wind forcing, the sea level pressure (SLP) played a dominant role in establishing the SSH difference and the correlation of the CAA outflow with the cross-strait SSH difference can be explained by a simple geostrophic balance. The change in the simulated CAA outflow transport through Davis Strait showed a negative correlation with the net flux through Fram Strait. This correlation was related to the variation of the spatial distribution and intensity of the slope current over the Beaufort Sea and Greenland shelves. The different basin-scale surface forcings can increase the model uncertainty in the CAA outflow flux up to 15%. The daily adjustment of the model elevation to the satellite-derived SSH in the North Atlantic region outside Fram Strait could produce a larger North Atlantic inflow through west Svalbard and weaken the outflow from the Arctic Ocean through east Greenland.

An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part III: Hydrography and fluxes

Ilicak, M., and 37 others, including B. Curry and C. Lee, "An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part III: Hydrography and fluxes," Ocean Modell., 100, 141-161, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2016.02.004, 2016.

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1 Apr 2016

Highlights

We compare the simulated Arctic Ocean in 15 global ocean–sea ice models.
There is a large spread in temperature bias in the Arctic Ocean between the models.
Warm bias models have a strong temperature anomaly of inflow of Atlantic Water.
Dense outflows formed on Arctic shelves are not captured accurately in the models.

An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part I: Sea ice and solid freshwater

Wang, Q., and 38 others, including B. Curry and C. Lee, "An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations. Part I: Sea ice and solid freshwater," Ocean Modell., 99, 110-132, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2015.12.008, 2016.

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1 Mar 2016

Highlights

Arctic sea ice extent and solid freshwater in 14 CORE-II models are inter-compared.
The models better represent the variability than the mean state.
The September ice extent trend is reasonably represented by the model ensemble mean.
The descending trend of ice thickness is underestimated compared to observations.
The models underestimate the reduction in solid freshwater content in recent years.

More Publications

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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